Dutch Baby or German Pancake

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Pancakes are lucky.  They get celebrated twice a year. If you miss the first Pancake Day (Britain’s version of Fat Tuesday), there is another. Today in fact!

And so I made a German Pancake, also known as a Dutch Baby Pancake.  

Puffed Up German Pancake

Puffed Up German Pancake

This fun and classic dish is basically a giant popover–creamy, egg-y center, puffy, crisp sides. I’ve wanted to make one for my family for ages, but it never took priority. But when I stumbled across an 8 inch cast iron pan, right before Pancake Day, it seemed like fate. 

German Pancake

German Pancake

Now German Pancakes and I go way back.  When I was growing up, I’d sometimes tag along with my parents on one of their “date nights”.   If we went to Pandl’s, a long established German restaurant, their German Pancake was top on my list of dinner entrees. Some people split it for dessert, but I just indulged. It also works great as a brunch dish.  German-Pancake-Above-3

The quantities is the recipe below worked perfectly for my 8 inch pan. We added some side pork (thick uncured bacon) and split it between three people, though most people would serve it to two. I would double or triple the quantities for a 10 or 12 inch pan or a bigger crowd.  

If you don’t have a cast iron skillet (or one the right size), people also make these in pie pans or stainless steel pans–anything that can go into the oven at a high temperature.  And as rich pancake dishes go, the calories are quite reasonable–as long as you watch the added syrup! 

German Pancake, Served

German Pancake, Served

Making this was actually super easy.  Just preheat the pan in the oven, blend up the ingredients in the blender and bake.  Why didn’t I try this before! 

Making a German Pancake

Making a German Pancake

I served this with powdered sugar and syrup, but next time I may go with a homemade compote or sliced fruit to up the health value. Happy Pancake Day!

German Pancake
Serves 2
With a creamy, egg-y center and puffy, crisp exterior, a German Pancake (or Dutch Baby Pancake) is perfect for breakfast, brunch or a fun dinner.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
30 min
255 calories
25 g
290 g
11 g
12 g
5 g
168 g
176 g
21 g
0 g
6 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
168g
Servings
2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 255
Calories from Fat 101
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 11g
17%
Saturated Fat 5g
24%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 4g
Cholesterol 290mg
97%
Sodium 176mg
7%
Total Carbohydrates 25g
8%
Dietary Fiber 0g
1%
Sugars 21g
Protein 12g
Vitamin A
13%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
14%
Iron
9%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3 eggs, room temperature
  2. 1/2 cup skim milk, room temperature
  3. 1/2 cup bread or all-purpose flour
  4. 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  5. 1 T sugar
  6. 2 T butter
  7. Powdered (confectioner's) sugar for garmish
Instructions
  1. Preeheat oven to 450F with the oven rack on the middle of your oven. Place an 8 inch heavy ovenproof frying pan or a cast iron skillet in the oven while it is preheating.
  2. In a large bowl or blender, combine the eggs, milk, flour, vanilla extract, and sugar. Beat for 5 minutes until smooth and creamy.
  3. When the oven is up to temperature, using pot holders, remove the hot skillet from the oven (or do this very carefully on the rack). Add the butter; tilting the pan to melt the butter and coat the skillet. Pour the prepared batter into the hot skillet, all at once, and immediately return the skillet to the oven.
  4. Bake approximately 20-25 minutes or until puffed and golden brown, watching carefully. The pancake should puff up around the edges; it may puff irregularly in the center.
  5. Carefully remove the pancake from the oven and serve immediately. For a classic German/Dutch Baby Pancake, dust the top with powdered sugar.
Notes
  1. Note: For a larger frying pan (and more servings), you can double the ingredients.
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calories
255
fat
11g
protein
12g
carbs
25g
more
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8 Comments

  1. Hi Inger!
    I totally missed Pancake Day today! I think I have a mental block because IHOP promotes Pancake Day whenever they feel like it, lol…I usually celebrate pancakes on Fat Tuesday.

    I do however LOVE Dutch Babies, especially the egg-y kind in a cast iron skillet. It really does make them the best! Yours looks heavenly!!!

    Thanks so much for sharing, Inger…Now I want a Dutch Baby, lol…

    • You know it is really due to you Louise, that I am much more aware of food celebrations. You’ve given me many more excuses for food fun so a big thank you!

  2. these are so much fun and so tasty! plus, i love an excuse to break out my cast iron skillet. 🙂

    • I am really happy to have acquired the small cast iron skillet. My original was so big I didn’t use it a lot. I can really see that changing!

  3. What looks good about this is that it doesn’t have much sugar, but seems like it would be sweet and delicious.

  4. Thank you!
    I looked at all the usual sites to answer my question about doubling the German Pancake and YOU had the answer for me.
    I have made the standard size, making it gluten free by using Bob’s Mills Gluten Free Baking Flour. It came out perfectly and I have enjoyed making it for friends.
    Now I have a larger crowd/audience and will double it.

    • I hope you have fun with your quests, Jeanne! This is such a nice recipe for a nice breakfast or bunch (or even dessert). If you stay tuned, I will be posting a recipe for an apple dutch baby later this summer (still working the kinks out of it…)

  5. Pingback: Apple Dutch Baby Pancake - Art of Natural Living

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