Cider Chicken & Noodles

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Dear Spring.  Can you come back—and stay? 

Cider Chicken & Noodles from above

Cider Chicken & Noodles from above

April has been a month of highs and lows—70’s, then 30’s, radiant sun, insane snow. Yes, for the roller coaster of April, a body needs need comfort food.  So I decided to try a version of a dish I remember from childhood, Cider Chicken & Noodles.  Reliving childhood food = I can make it until summer. 

Late Snowfall in Ephraim WI

Late Snowfall in Ephraim WI

The original dish used sausage, but since I had chicken (actually turkey) on hand, I decided to use that, adding bacon (or side pork in this case) to keep the rich goodness. Natural cooking can mean working with what you have!

The dish is flavored with wine, cider and caraway for a home style German feel–but just a little lighter.   I love the fact that it gives you a serving of fruit (apples & cider) plus a serving of vegetables (sauerkraut).  Just add a salad and dinner is done. 

Cooking Cider Chicken & Noodles

Cooking Cider Chicken & Noodles

There was one other component to my motivation.  Recently, I cut up a huge turkey. 

I remember my mother cutting up whole turkeys when we were kids.  Buy a big bird during the Thanksgiving sales.  Thaw it partially in the spare fridge so you can move the legs (with effort), but it still has ice crystals. Then cut it into leg quarters, wings, slice the breast into cutlets and boil the carcass for broth.  How often can you get turkey cutlets for under $1/pound?  Even cheaper if your sister-in-law gives you a (ginormous) bird she decided not to use.

Cutting up semi-frozen turkey

Cutting up semi-frozen turkey

I kept the turkey in the freezer for months, intimidated by the whole prospect.  Then I got up my courage, found a great link with tips on the internet and went to work.  It all felt good, but it’s definitely a once a year project! 

Cider Chicken & Noodles on table

Cider Chicken & Noodles on table

There is one little quirk to serving this if you are using fresh (with the live cultures) sauerkraut (like homemade or a refrigerated commercial like Zymbiotics).  Heating the kraut up with the sauce will kill the cultures and reduce the probiotic benefits, so I added it as I served it.  If you are using a heat-canned kraut, you can add it anytime.   

Cider Chicke & Noodles closeup

Cider Chicke & Noodles closeup

Of course the dish I remember from childhood didn’t have wine (or probiotics).  I guess this means that comfort food can get even better when you grow up! 

Flicker

After the snow…

Cider Chicken & Noodles
Yields 5
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Total Time
20 min
Total Time
20 min
561 calories
74 g
130 g
8 g
40 g
2 g
452 g
678 g
20 g
0 g
5 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
452g
Yields
5
Amount Per Serving
Calories 561
Calories from Fat 73
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 8g
13%
Saturated Fat 2g
12%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 130mg
43%
Sodium 678mg
28%
Total Carbohydrates 74g
25%
Dietary Fiber 7g
29%
Sugars 20g
Protein 40g
Vitamin A
3%
Vitamin C
30%
Calcium
8%
Iron
21%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. • 3 slices thick bacon (or 2 of side pork), diced
  2. • 1 medium onion, chopped
  3. • 2 cloves garlic
  4. • 1 lb skinless chicken breasts, cut into strips (or turkey or lean pork)
  5. • 1/3 c flour
  6. • 1 cup apple cider, apple juice or broth (see note)
  7. • 3/4 cup white wine
  8. • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  9. • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  10. • ½ teaspoon salt
  11. • 2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  12. • 3 apples, cored and chopped (no need to peel)
  13. • 2 1/2 cups sauerkraut
  14. • 10 oz wide egg noodles or whole wheat fettuccine
Instructions
  1. Sautee bacon in large frying pan until mostly crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Drain and reserve all but about 1 tablespoon of the fat.
  2. Add onion and garlic to the frying pan and cook until turning golden. Push to the side of the pan.
  3. Dredge the chicken strips in flour. Add 2 tablespoons of reserved fat to frying pan and sautee the chicken until almost cooked through.
  4. Deglaze the pan with the wine, scraping up any browned bits. Add the salt, pepper, mustard, caraway, reserved bacon, chopped apple and cider. Simmer, stirring periodically until the chicken is cooked through and the sauce is thickened. (Adjust flour/wine if needed for proper thickening)
  5. To serve, drain the hot pasta and stir the sauerkraut into the noodles. Pour into a serving dish or dishes, then top with the chicken and sauce. Serve immediately
Notes
  1. If you don't have apple cider, you can use broth--in that case, add an extra chopped apple or two to bring out the apple flavor.
beta
calories
561
fat
8g
protein
40g
carbs
74g
more
Art of Natural Living http://artofnaturalliving.com/
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5 Comments

  1. Our weather has been pretty spring-like, and I’m nearly certain winter is behind us. Still, I’ll happily eat comfort food all year!

  2. Love noodles with chicken, sounds delicious !!
    Yours pictures are awesome Inger <3 <3

  3. what kind of bird is that? i think spring is here to stay in nc and i couldn’t be happier about that, even if it means rain every other day!
    this is a delicious chicken preparation, inger–i’d love it any time of year!

  4. This is such an interesting chicken…with cider…I can imagine how tasty this pasta dish must be…
    Beautiful pictures Inger…have a great week 🙂

  5. This sounds really wonderful, Inger. I love comfort food dishes from peoples’ childhoods!

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