Candied Orange Slices

These soft and chewy Candied Orange Slices are perfect for garnishing your favorite desserts and drinks. Or cover them in chocolate for a fun treat!

Bursting with a sweet citrus flavor, these Candied Orange Slices have a soft inside pulp and a chewy outer rind that is completely edible. Not only are these candied citrus slices delicious, they are pretty enough to decorate your desserts and drinks! Try them on fancier cakes, as cocktail garnishes, or even chocolate-covered orange slices for a special treat. 

Candied Orange Slices are  easy to make and you’ll even get an orange flavored simple syrup you can use afterward. And they are created simply by boiling thin slices in sugar syrup then cooling–the details are below.

Did you know that citrus peels are more nutritious than the juice?  According to Healthline, “orange peels are also rich in several nutrients, including fiber, vitamin C, and plant compounds like polyphenols. In fact, just 1 tablespoon (6 grams) of orange peel provides 14% of the Daily Value (DV) of vitamin C — nearly 3 times more than the inner fruit. The same serving also packs about 4 times more fiber.”

What are Candied Fruits?

Candied fruits are either whole fruits or pieces of fruits that are boiled in sugar syrup, and left to crystallize for a sweet treat. There are many different fruits that are used for this process such as dates, cherries, grapes, ginger root, and citrus fruits. 

Candied Fruit vs. Dried Fruit

Although the candied and dried fruit are closely related, they are very different. Candied fruits, as discussed earlier, are heated in simple syrup to preserve through the displacement of water by sugar.  Dried fruit is created by the process of dehydration either by sun-drying the fruits or using an oven or dehydrator.  They’re preserved simply because of the reduction in water content.  Candied fruits are sweeter and often moister, which for citrus, means you can even eat the normally discarded peel!  These soft and chewy Candied Orange Slices are perfect for garnishing your favorite desserts and drinks. Or cover them in chocolate for a fun treat!

Why You’ll Love This!  

A lovely garnish. Candied orange slices are a convenient decoration that is both pretty and edible–and which can easily elevate your cake design.

Delicious treat. Eat them as is or dip them in chocolate for a delicious treat.

Easy to make. With only a few ingredients and simple steps, you’ll soon be using these candied orange slices all over!

What You’ll Need

Ingredients and Notes

  • Granulated sugar. Along with water, this makes the simple syrup that is used to candy the citrus slices.
  • Citrus. A variety of citrus can be used but kumquats and mandarin oranges are especially nice. Smaller citrus fruits are less likely to break apart when boiled. Fruit should be cut about 1/8 inch thick and the ends discarded.

Special Tools

  • A sharp knife or mandolin to thinly cut the slices.
  • A digital thermometer to check the temperature of the simple syrup.
  • A wire rack or parchment paper to set the candied orange slices on to cool 

kumquat and mandarin orange slicees.

Step by Step Directions 

Make your simple syrup.  In a saucepan, combine sugar and water. Stir until combined, then heat on medium until the mixture reaches approximately 225F.

Pre-boil the orange slices in water to reduce bitterness.  While the syrup is heating, bring a couple of cups of water to a boil in a separate saucepan. Drop in the orange slices and boil for two minutes. After two minutes, remove orange slices to an ice bath to cool. 

Boil orange slices in water first.

Boil the orange slices in the simple syrup.  When the sugar mixture reaches 225F, add the boiled and cooled citrus slices and adjust the heat to a low boil.  When the syrup reaches 245-250F, take the pan off the heat. Use a fork to remove the slices one at a time and set them onto a wire rack. 

Let them cool and solidify for 30-60 minutes. 

Garnish your cake with Candied Orange Slices or enjoy a tasty snack!

Conquering Candied Orange Challenges

There are a few challenges making candied citrus that are easy to conquer if you know how!

The first challenge is keeping the slices from shredding in the boiling sugar syrup.  Here, using smaller diameter slices is helpful.  Kumquats, limes (Key and Persian limes), lemons and mandarin oranges all worked well. 

The other useful technique is to wait until the syrup reaches 225 F before adding the fruit.  This reduces the time the fruit is rolling around in the sugar bath, but still allows plenty of time for the sugar to infuse. 

The second challenge is delivering a slice that is sugary, pliable, tacky and glossy.  This is achieved by removing the slices when the syrup is in the “firm ball” stage (245-250F).  At this stage, a drop of cooled sugar syrup forms a ball that holds together but can be flattened since it is still pliable.  This means that the syrup doesn’t run off the orange slice like pancake syrup would, yet is still soft and chewy.

To learn more about candy making, take a look at Pistachio Brittle without Corn Syrup which discusses the general candy-making process, how sugar changes as it cooks, and crystallization. Drying candied orange slices and candied lime slices.

How to Serve 

There are many ways to use and serve these Candied Orange Slices. Here are some of our favorite ways:

  • You can eat them as candy as is or coat them in sugar
  • Use to decorate your cakes, cupcakes or muffins
  • Use them as colored glass windows on your gingerbread house
  • Garnish your cocktails and non-alcoholic drinks
  • Cover or dip in chocolate for an even more special treat

And consider wrapping some up to give as a gift for the holidays or any season!

Chocolate dipped candied orange slices

Variations (Candied Lime Slices?)

You can use different types of citrus fruit to make candied citrus slices. Limes and lemons both fit the smaller diameter criterion and are great candidates. 

If you want to make slices in more than one color, just be sure to boil the different colors separately to keep the colors true.  My candied lime slices took on a distinct orange tone when I boiled them with mandarins and kumquats! 

I did try using larger blood oranges and in this case cut the slices in half, like a smile.  They fell apart a bit more and I decided that if I wanted the look of this I might still go for it–but make twice as many as I needed and use the best looking. 

Saving the Orange Syrup

A tasty simple syrup that is subtly flavored with orange can be a nice side benefit of this recipe.  If you want to save your syrup, you will need to add a little water to the syrup after you remove the orange slices.  Remember that the syrup is at the “firm ball” stage so if you simply cool it down, it will be a sticky putty-like substance, not a syrup. 

So once the orange slices are on the drying rack, add a few tablespoons of water to the hot syrup, then stir vigorously to incorporate.  Be ready in case it spatters.  Then strain and store the syrup in the refrigerator where it can be used for cocktails or other recipes that call for a simple syrup.  It should keep about 2 weeks.  Strain the orange syrup

Tips and FAQs

If you are using these for decoration, it is nice to have a variety of sizes. 

I slightly preferred the look of the slices dried on the rack rather than parchment.  The parchment dried slices had more of a mat look on the back side (not that this is a huge problem).

How to Slice

One trick to perfecting your Candied Orange Slices is to slice them just right—not too thin nor too thick. The thicker they are, the longer it will take for them to dry and they just won’t look as appealing. However, if you slice them too thin, they might not hold shape during the boiling process. I settled on 1/8 inch, or maybe slightly thicker, as the happy medium.

I used a mandolin and found that setting it to 1/4 inch gave me approximately 1/8 inch citrus slices.  (For anything else 1/4 inch gives 1/4 inch slices–go figure.)  For fruits with seeds, like my kumquats, you may need to check between slices and remove the seeds.  And since it can be easy to slip and cut yourself using a mandolin, consider using the metal mesh gloves that help protect your hands. Slicing with a mandolin

A sharp knife can also be used to cut the fruit.  Especially if you aren’t making a lot. 

I discarded the ends of the fruits, since I was going for the stained glass look rather than the candied rind look.  

Storing Candied Slices

I’ve stored these at room temperature for a week with good results. For longer storage I’d be inclined to pop then in the refrigerator or freezer.  My guess is that if you get the temperature to 245-250F as per my instructions, the water content is reduced enough that they are pretty effectively preserved–but I can’t find any science to back this up. 

Cleanup

One of the nice things about cooking with sugar is that it is water soluble.  This means that utensils that get coated in stickiness can be put into water (assuming they are water safe) and the sugar will dissolve off.

After making this recipe, I stuck my drying rack upside down in a water filled lasagna pan to allow the sugar to dissolve!

These soft and chewy Candied Orange Slices are perfect for garnishing your favorite desserts and drinks. Or cover them in chocolate for a fun treat!

Candied Orange Slices

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 2 hours 15 minutes

These soft and chewy Candied Orange Slices are perfect for garnishing your favorite desserts and drinks or cover them in chocolate for a fun treat!

Ingredients

Simple syrup

  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ cup water

Citrus

  • 1-2 dozen smaller orange citrus slices (I used kumquats and mandarins)

Instructions

Make your simple syrup. In a 1 quart saucepan, combine sugar and water.  Stir until combined, then heat on medium until mixture reaches approximately 225F. Be sure not to stir the syrup after it boils, since that can cause crystals. 

Pre-boil your orange slices. While the syrup is heating, bring a couple of cups of water to a boil.  Drop the orange slices and boil for two minutes.  After two minutes, remove orange slices to an ice bath to cool.  This step helps to reduce bitterness. 

Boil the orange slices in the simple syrup. When the sugar mixture reaches 225F, add the boiled and cooled citrus slices and adjust the heat to a low boil.  Don’t stir, but you can press down on the slices if they seem to be floating too much.  Turn top slices over occasionally.    

When the syrup reaches 245-250F, take the pan off the heat.  Use a fork to take the slices out one at a time and set them onto a wire rack (ideally) or parchment (second choice).  Let them cool and solidify for 30-60 minutes.   

If you want to save the syrup (at this point, when cooled, it will be a tacky, stretchy solid, not a syrup), add a few tablespoons of water as soon as the slices are removed and stir vigorously to incorporate.  Be careful since the syrup may splatter.  You can reuse the syrup for one more batch of slices (after two it becomes too bitter) or as a simple syrup for drinks or recipes.

4 thoughts on “Candied Orange Slices

  1. Radha

    These look so delicious. I have never attempted in making candy peels and now I have your recipe to start. Thanks for sharing.

    1. Inger Post author

      They are sticky Tandy. But for drier, you should be able to cook to a higher temperature–probably 270 F (135 C). This would also make them more crunchy and less chewy but if that works for you I don’t see why this wouldn’t work. You might also put them in the boiling syrup later in that case, maybe when it’s around 240 F (115C). I’d need too test to confirm, but in theory this should work. Basically, you’d just be taking out more water. If you try it let me know how it goes!

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