Thai Green Noodles (with Swiss Chard–shhh)

Green.  The color of spring… the color of kale… and Swiss Chard.  The spring part is easy, but the other greens, like Kale and Swiss Chard, can be a challenge to prepare in a household with kids. We get them in abundance from the CSAs, and no one, not even me (shhh), likes to eat them straight. But at long last, I have found a recipe that could change this. I am calling it Thai Green Noodles.

Up close Thai Green Noodles

Up close Thai Green Noodles

Now, you’ll notice that I haven’t named it “Noodles with Swiss Chard” or “Pasta with Ground Greens.” You see my kids (and I’m pretty sure my husband) look at kale and chard as the land version of pond scum and I’m not giving them any more ammunition.

Thai Green Noodles, Cooking

Thai Green Noodles, Cooking

After years of trying different recipes, I (as in me and no one else) have started eating kale as kale chips or chard with prosciutto–so our greens no longer hit the compost bin. But the rest of the family still turns up their collective noses and I prefer not to eat alone.

Thai Green Noodles with Tea

Thai Green Noodles with Tea

This recipe comes from the blog Produce on Parade and I’m not even sure how I found it. The new name was my idea for marketing purposes–doesn’t Thai Green Noodles sound like something your kids might order at Noodles? I followed the original pretty closely, but we were out of spinach (there are fights over who gets the spinach in our house–go figure) and I made some other minor changes. Finally I garnished it with cashews and sesame seeds. The verdict? They’ll eat this again anytime. Hooray!

Thai Green Noodles, Served

Thai Green Noodles, Served

Thai Green Noodles with Swiss Chard

Thai Green Noodles with Swiss Chard

Yield: 8
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 16 oz. whole wheat fettuccini
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 1/2 T fresh ginger, grated (or powdered ginger, to taste)
  • 1 15 oz. can coconut milk
  • 1T sugar
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 t. salt
  • 1/2 t fresh black pepper
  • 1/8 t red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 1 bunch of fresh swiss chard, or kale, de-stemmed and torn
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil, optional, or 1 T prepared pesto
  • 1 T cornstarch
  • 1/4 c cashews, chopped and/or sesame seeds (optional)

Instructions

  1. Cook pasta according to package until al dente.
  2. While pasta is cooking heat the oil over medium in a large, high rimmed saute pan. Add the garlic and ginger. Cook until fragrant, about 3-5 minutes.
  3. Add in the coconut milk, sugar, lemon juice, torn Swiss Chard, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes. Stir well, bring to a simmer and cook until chard is wilted, about 5 minutes.
  4. Transfer to a blender, add the basil, and blend until smooth and creamy. Taste and adjust seasonings, then transfer back to the large saute pan. In a small bowl or cup, mix the cornstarch with 1-2 T of water to make a slurry. Add the slurry to the sauce and bring back to a simmer, stirring, until slightly thickened.
  5. Combine sauce with hot pasta and top with cashews and sesame seeds if desired. Serve hot.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 8 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 410Total Fat: 19gSaturated Fat: 11gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 6gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 381mgCarbohydrates: 53gFiber: 9gSugar: 2gProtein: 13g

Nutrition data accuracy may vary with product selection, calculator accuracy, etc. Consult a professional for the best information.

  Also seen on: Kelly the Kitchen Kop

14 thoughts on “Thai Green Noodles (with Swiss Chard–shhh)

  1. grace

    the black sesame seeds are a fabulous touch! i love their contrast and they must provide a great crunch. cashews make me happy too. 🙂

    1. Inger Post author

      Thanks Grace. I initially thought of look and authenticity when I decided what to use for the garnish (in summer, I will probably use some cilantro too). But I was also pleased with the flavor they added when I tasted.

    1. Inger Post author

      Thanks for sharing this and stopping by! We have had it twice now–I may even try growing some Swiss Chard!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


css.phpSkip to Recipe