Elderflower Cordial (Elderflower Syrup)

| 10 Comments

 
I was hungry and tired and my spirits were low,
  For I got neither whiskey nor cordial.

I hadn’t heard the old Irish folksong in years, but making Elderflower Cordial brought it back. Although I doubt the down-on-his-luck farmhand was thinking of non-alcoholic elderflower cordial, I like a straight fruit or flower syrup which gives me the option to have a  boozy drink, or not.  

Elderflower Cordial

Elderflower Cordial

Ever since I got a soda stream a while back (not an affiliate), I have been a homemade soda monster.  If it grows, I’ll boil it with sugar and water, strain, and top the resulting syrup with fizzy water.  It all started on my diet last year, when I realized that if I didn’t stay hydrated, I was going to stay chubby.  Now it’s taken on a life of its own. 

Steep elderflower in simple syrup

Steep elderflower in simple syrup

Strain out flowers after steeping

Strain out flowers after steeping

But elderflower cordial is a classic, which actually makes me a bit of a latecomer (later bloomer?).  Per Wikipedia:

Historically the cordial has been popular in North Western Europe where it has a strong Victorian heritage. However, versions of an elderflower cordial recipe can be traced back to Roman times. Nowadays it can be found in almost all of the former Roman Empire territory, predominantly in Central Europe, especially in Germany, Austria, Romania, Hungary and Slovakia, where people have acquired a special taste for it and still make it in the traditional way.

A few years back, I was looking for some bushes/trees that I could harvest.  Elderflower bushes ended up on my list and I planted two mail order “sticks.” One, which did poorly, languished along a tree row even though I read they were “understory” plants.  And where was it I planted the second?  (Proving you can lose plants in a 3/4 acre yard.) 

Elderflower bush/Elderberry bush

Elderflower bush/Elderberry bush

Elderflowers on tree

Elderflowers on tree

This year, however, the missing elderberry burst forth with such a profusion of blossoms, I couldn’t help but rediscover it (wedged between a pear tree and the jungle plantings along the lot line).  And so I made elderflower cordial! I even found some ready-to-download labels online (I shrunk them to fit my small bottle)! 

Top elderflower cordial with fizzy water

Top elderflower cordial with fizzy water

The elderflower cordial is much less “flowery” than other flower syrups I’ve made.  I would describe the flavor as sweet (from the sugar) and herbal.  I liked it in fizzy water with a squeeze of lime—and soon, I’ll be trying some with a little vodka too.  Elderflowers figure in folk medicine and some people believe they have a variety of benefits

Happy summer! 

Elderflower cordial with lime

Elderflower cordial with lime

Elderberry Cordial
Serves 8
Elderflower cordial is a sweet herbal-tasting syrup made of flowers from the elderflower bush. Delicious with fizzy water--with or without vodka!
Write a review
Print
97 calories
25 g
0 g
0 g
0 g
0 g
85 g
3 g
25 g
0 g
0 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
85g
Servings
8
Amount Per Serving
Calories 97
Calories from Fat 0
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 0g
0%
Saturated Fat 0g
0%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 3mg
0%
Total Carbohydrates 25g
8%
Dietary Fiber 0g
0%
Sugars 25g
Protein 0g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
2%
Calcium
0%
Iron
0%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup water
  2. 1 cup sugar
  3. 6-8 large elderberry blossoms, most of stem removed (all won't be realistic)
  4. zest and juice from 1 lemon
  5. Fizzy water for serving
Instructions
  1. Harvest flowers that are in good condition and cut off as much of the stem (which is toxic) as realistic. A bit of stem shouldn’t hurt.
  2. Heat the water and sugar to boiling and stir to dissolve sugar. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the blossoms, lemon zest and juice.
  3. Cover and let sit for 24-48 hours. Strain, then keep refrigerated and use within a week or so.
  4. To serve, top with fizzy water. Alcohol optional.
Notes
  1. Some recipes use citric acid which would preserve this longer. It can also be frozen for longer storage.
  2. In addition to the stems, the plant leaves and unripe berries are reported to be toxic.
beta
calories
97
fat
0g
protein
0g
carbs
25g
more
Art of Natural Living http://artofnaturalliving.com/
It's so nice to share...
Share on Facebook4Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Yummly0Share on Google+0Email this to someoneShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Tumblr0

10 Comments

  1. I envy you your elderflowers, Inger! I would love to make this!

  2. This looks so delightful! I have heard about elder flower syrup but never used in anything.

  3. i don’t think i’ve ever had elderflower ANYTHING, but this looks lovely and refreshing! also, i’d say that homemade sodas are a far superior alternative!

    • I had never had it before either. One of my local blogging friends is a fan of the liqueur version of this, and that’s where I got the idea. Love blogging friends!

  4. Excited for you to get to make and try elderberry juice and syrup from the fresh berries. Hope you enjoy that as well.

    • There are plenty of flowers left, so I am hoping to use the berries later on too Soph! Thanks for the reminder!

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *.


css.php