Blender Swedish Pancakes Recipe

Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes.  Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes. 

The summer Olympics provided the perfect excuse to update my Swedish Pancakes recipe, first published in 2011.  The family was psyched for a good breakfast. And I was excited to get big points making a really easy, 5-ingredient recipe! 

Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes. Step by Step Directions

Making the batter in a blender makes this recipe super easy!

You start by blending the liquid ingredients together, then adding the flour.

blend ingredients

Set your burner to medium and preheat your pan.  Spray your pan with non-stick spray and pour in about 1/3 cup of batter.  Tilt the pan and swirl around around to create a thin round layer (but not too thin).  Imperfect rounds are absolutely fine!  cook pancake

When surface is dry and edges are turning golden, run a spatula (metal for a stainless pan, silicone for non-stick) under the pancake to ensure that it’s loose, then flip the pancake over.Flip pancake

Continue cooking until the second side is turning golden, then fold into thirds for serving.  You can keep warm in a 200F oven if desired.  cook second side

Scrape or wipe pan between pancakes and re-spray.  Repeat until batter is used up.  

And as a special tip, using two frying pans at a time will speed things up!

Serving Accompaniments 

The most common way to serve Swedish Pancakes is with butter and syrup or with lingonberry preserves.  Berries or other fruits with whipped cream is also popular.

You can even serve Swedish Pancakes with savory sides. Al Johnson’s Swedish Restaurant in Sister Bay, WI offers options like Ham and Swedish Meatballs.

My personal favorite is to go sweet, topping half with butter and syrup and the other half with lingonberries.  Or loaded with fresh berries.   Plus a side of Canadian bacon to balance the carbs! Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes. 

How are Swedish pancakes different from crepes?

Of course everyone’s first question is how do they compare to crepes–even from my daughter who started eating them as a baby! After reading a number of answers (some of which made no sense), I decided to do a recipe comparison myself. And the short answer is that Swedish pancakes have more milk.

The average Swedish pancake recipe has a ratio of 1 cup flour to 2 cups milk to 2 eggs. A typical crepe recipe has 1 cup flour to 1 ¼ cups milk (or a combo of milk and water) to 2 eggs. Both recipes had similar amounts of sugar, butter and vanilla (those seemed to vary randomly)

This may be responsible for the slightly greater strength of crepes that allows them to wrapped around fillings more easily. When you see a crepe, the filling is frequently inside where for Swedish pancakes it is usually on top.

Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes. Using a Stainless Steel Pan

While most people use a non-stick pan, I don’t own one (for why, see Harvard School of Health on PFAS) and have no problem making Swedish Pancakes in a stainless steel pan. There are a couple secrets however. First you need a good quality pan—it doesn’t need to be a top dollar All-Clad, but that dollar store pan may have too rough of a finish to work well.

Next the pan needs to be hot before you start—a few drops of water dropped on the surface should immediately sizzle (if they spurt off, volcano-like, the pan is too hot). Finally a spray of Pam completes the preparation process—butter is not recommended since the solids in it can burn and stick.  prep stainless steel pan

Finally, when the pancake is ready to turn, I run a thin stainless steel spatula gently under it to make sure it is loose, and to dislodge any small areas of sticking. Then between pancakes, I scrape off leftover residue, if any, with the same metal spatula. (This is also done, just with a cloth for a non-stick pan). The first pancake or two is the hardest, so sometimes, I just have to eat those myself!

Yes, I have used stainless steel successfully for years and I expect cast iron would yield similar results. And of course, back when Swedish pancakes were first made, Teflon-style pans didn’t even exist.

Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes. Can I use whole wheat flour?

Since there is no need to develop gluten in pancakes, they will work with whole wheat flour, but the flavor would change. Less intensely flavored options like white whole wheat flour might work better.  Start by swapping out just half the flour at first (these are about 2/3 white whole wheat flour).   

And if you are really looking for healthier options, consider serving with fresh berries. Then you get a serving of fruit plus less sugar than with syrup or preserves. And even if you still add a little whipped cream or syrup, you are likely to use less.

pancakes with raspberries and whipped cream

Can I freeze these?

If you are looking for a make-ahead and freeze recipe, consider this first. Since these are blended in a blender, then cooked up quickly, the time spent wrapping, freezing, thawing and re-heating is certainly more than the time spent just cooking up a fresh batch.

But should you happen to have leftovers before going on vacation, I hear that they freeze well. Just be sure to separate the individual pancakes with wax paper so they don’t stick.

Eating them in a restaurantAre Swedish pancakes only for breakfast?

On a busy day, I think having breakfast for dinner is a perfect “Desperate Mom” option.  And, happily, this recipe requires no unusual ingredients.

In fact this post was originally written as a nod to my “corporate mom” days, when I’d regularly arrive home late, then realize I was either too tired to cook what I’d planned, or forgot to thaw the chicken.

Since it’s low on veggies, add a bagged salad or serve some carrots and dip “while you wait”. A little leftover ham or cheese could add some protein (though I worry more about getting in veggies, than enough protein).

Pretty sure your kids will love it!

And for more Olympics inspired international recipes see:

Wednesday #SummerGamesWeek Recipes

Swedish Pancakes

Tender, delicious Swedish Pancakes are a special treat for breakfast, dessert or even dinner. Made in a blender, they are ready in minutes. 
Author: Inger
4.84 from 6 votes
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 20 mins
Course Breakfast
Cuisine swedish
Servings 10
Calories 381 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 3 cups milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 Tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 ½ cups flour

Instructions
 

  • Blend the liquid ingredients (milk, egg, melted butter, vanilla and sugar) together, then add the flour and blend until incorporated.
  • Set the burner to medium and preheat your frying pan. Spray the pan with non-stick spray and pour in about 1/3 cup of batter. Tilt the pan and swirl around to create a thin round pancake. Imperfect rounds are absolutely fine!
  • When surface is dry and edges are turning golden, run a spatula (metal for a stainless pan, silicone for non-stick) under the pancake to ensure that it's loose, then flip the pancake over.
  • Continue cooking until the second side is turning golden, then fold into thirds. You can keep warm in a 200F oven if desired.
  • Scrape or wipe pan between pancakes and re-spray. Continue until batter is used up.

Notes

Using two frying pans will speed up the cooking time!

Nutrition

Serving: 2-3/servingCalories: 381kcalCarbohydrates: 48gProtein: 16gFat: 13gSaturated Fat: 7gPolyunsaturated Fat: 5gCholesterol: 169mgSodium: 195mgFiber: 1gSugar: 3g
I am not a health professional and nutrition data is calculated programatically. Accuracy may vary with product selection, calculator accuracy, etc. Consult a professional for the best information.
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

36 thoughts on “Blender Swedish Pancakes Recipe

  1. Raymund

    Ohhh I never knew they were different from the French ones, I just notice when I had them in Sweeden a couple of years ago that they were softer.

  2. David Scott Allen

    Thank you for answering my crêpe question before I asked it! 🙂 These look wonderful – and I imagine less eggy than crêpes, too. I really need to put on my big boy pants and try making them in my stainless pan…

  3. Thao @ In Good Flavor

    I love how thin and tender these pancakes look! I have completely switched over to healthier non-stick options, and I’m making greater effort to use stainless steel more. Thanks for the great tips for preventing pancakes from sticking!

    1. Inger Post author

      One of these days I’m putting together a video on frying an egg in stainless steel!

  4. Kathy

    5 stars
    These Swedish pancakes were a big hit at home. Very easy and so tasty! Definitely a recipe to keep handy.

    1. Inger Post author

      I was figuring it would. I’m using a cast iron grill pan for so much meat and fish now and we love that. Nice that the pans come pre-seasoned now too, though II took my parents old pan and re-seasoned it without a problem.

  5. Rebecca

    5 stars
    I loved making these for breakfast! And making the batter in a blender…what a genius tip! These were so good, crispy and soft at the same time. I can’t wait to try all different kinds of toppings with these!

  6. Jennifer

    These look fantastic and I love how easy they are to make. Will be making this weekend for sure. Just need to figure out the toppings.

  7. John / Kitchen Riffs

    Such an informative post! And thanks for clearing up the difference between Swedish pancakes and crepes — as I was reading, I was wondering, and your answer came at the perfect time in the post. I do use nonstick pans, but I’ve been rethinking that lately. Need to do some experimenting — in most ways I actually prefer using stainless or cast iron, just with a bit more lubricant. Anyway, thanks for this.

    1. Inger Post author

      We have PFAS contamination sites all over Wisconsin. I look at the fact that we can’t eat most Lake Michigan fish more than once a month due to a variety of contaminants and it’s just such a sad squandering of resources. So this is one way I take a stand. Plus I never have to replace a pan 🙂

  8. Amy Nash

    We have been to Al Johnson’s in Wisconsin and enjoyed their Swedish pancakes a lot! I can’t wait to try these myself and see how they compare!

  9. Pingback: Organic Strawberry Syrup and Pancakes (or…) | Art of Natural Living

  10. Soap Mom

    I have more nights like that during the week than I care to admit, but I often do dinner for breakfast when I am exhausted. I love pancakes and french toast for dinner. I will have to do your Swedish Pancakes they sound perfect!

  11. Rita

    I make crêpes but never Sweedish pancakes; you got my attention. These look fantastic an i know what you mean; when it get s hot it is so nice to have a light meal; gotta try this; thank you for your visit.
    Rita

  12. Louise

    Swedish pancakes are my very best favorite! I have the Ligonberry jelly now all I need is those pancakes; breakfast, lunch or dinner is fine by me!!!

    Thanks for sharing, Inger…

    1. Inger Wilkerson

      Mmmm, I like lingonberries too! A restaurant we go to serves this with Swedish Pancakes but I haven’t found any canned that I like as well. I did use homemade cranberry sauce once after I found out that the two fruits were related. Now I can’t wait for the cranberry harvest to try it again!

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